Draw A Bird, September 2022

We just returned from an adventurous trip to Alaska and are blessed to have visited there twice. This trip was planned for August 2020, but “you-know-what” happened and the trip was cancelled. Things seemed pretty much back to normal, but some restaurants had closed and some places were short-staffed, but that seems to be the current situation all over the U.S.

Previously I made scrapbooks of our travel adventures but stopped doing so a few years ago. When we moved last year, I realized just how many trip scrapbooks I’ve made, how much work I put into them, and how little we look at them. However, after each trip that I did not scrap, there was a feeling of disappointment and let-down because nothing was documented and because we had just a smattering of photos on our cell phones. However, I think I’ve found a happy medium.

On a YouTube video, Lindsay Weirich (The Frugal Crafter) featured handmade watercolor sketchbooks gifted by an Etsy shopkeeper, ArtsiRosi. I purchased a small book made with Arches cold press watercolor paper (the best), packed up a Portable Painter Watercolor Palette, a Derwent push-button water brush, and a few other essentials. Sketching our way through Alaska and detailing some of the highlights was so satisfying and fun. I drew and painted in the car while traveling from city to city, in the evenings, and on the plane.

View from the Plane
View from the Plane

Because it is Draw A Bird day (unofficially), here are two of the many species of birds we saw. I have always wanted to see a Puffin in its own environment, and boy were there puffins (horned and tufted)! The ravens are bold and huge and likely could feed a family of four, but that’s probably not recommended 😉

Tufted Puffin
Tufted Puffin
Nevermore, A Common Raven

It’s joyful to remember where these quick-ish sketches (definitely not masterpieces) were created, and the plan is to feature some favorites over the next couple of weeks. Do you document your trips? What methods do you use? Take care ❤

Draw A Bird, June 2022

What a delight is this Ruby Crowned Kinglet? Our area is right on the cusp of their migration, and my sister-in-law Diana was lucky enough to see one migrating through last year.

Ruby Crowned Kinglet
Ruby Crowned Kinglet

Maybe one day I’ll be fortunate enough to see one at our feeders; it’s such a joy to discover our migratory avian friends!

Draw A Bird, May 2022

This portrait of a bossy blue jay was a pleasure to paint: so calming and meditative, which is the exact opposite of a blue jay’s personality!

While they are known to be bullies at the feeders, they also “jeer” a loud call in order to track their mates and to warn of impending threats. When that happens, all the birds fly off and take cover.

Bossy Blue Jay
Bossy Blue Jay

Hearing their urgent, incessant caws gets our attention, too, and we try to figure out what all the squawking is about. Usually it is a cat or large raptor getting too close for comfort. Blue jays truly are the town criers of the avian species!

Fancy Frog

This fancy frog is a red-eyed tree frog, native to the tropics. As with most things in nature, this frog’s festive colors serve certain purposes. Its bright colors are defense mechanisms, and being green helps this amphibian blend in with leaves. If a predator spots a sleeping frog, it swoops in for a tasty meal, at which point the frog’s eyes pop open, revealing their vivid red color.

Fancy Frog
Fancy Frog

As the frog scrambles to get away, it untucks its brightly colored legs. The predator is so surprised by these sudden flashes of color that it is momentarily confused and hesitates, which gives the frog a split second to make its escape! How fascinating!

Inquisitive Kangaroo

This up-close-and-personal kangaroo was photographed by my brother-in-law Don. I’m not sure I’d want to get so close to one, but hopefully he was using a zoom lens!

Inquisitive Kangaroo
Inquisitive Kangaroo

Kangaroos live in social groups called mobs.  Males, called boomers, are twice the size of females, called flyers. Kangaroos cover more than 20 feet in a single bound and reach speeds up to 30 miles per hour. Newborn joeys are just one inch long at birth, or about the size of a grape. Isn’t that fascinating?

Draw A Bird, November 2021

Nuthatches are interesting little birds to observe and easily recognized amongst all the others, especially if you see them walking/hopping DOWN the trunk of a tree. Nuthatches are the only birds to exhibit this peculiar behavior, but it is thought that they do so to search for insects and hide nuts and seeds away from other animals. Most other birds climb UP a tree, but climbing down provides a viewpoint to only a nuthatch, thereby keeping their treasured seeds safe for their next meal.

Nuthatch
Nuthatch

I don’t consider myself a true “birder” but surely do enjoy our local backyard birds. What is the most amusing bird you’ve ever seen? Are you are enjoying the changing of the seasons? I am, but because of Daylight Saving time, it is now dark by 6:00 PM, of which I am not a fan; at least we were able to enjoy an extra hour of time this weekend. Be well!

Draw A Bird, October 2021

Hi Friends! This month’s bird was painted using a quick, loose method taught by Tom Shepherd of https://www.tomshepherdart.com/. It’s fun to switch up techniques and learn something new; however, I still fiddle and sometimes want to add too much detail, even though this technique does not need many details.

Male Cardinal
Male Cardinal

We’ve been enjoying the cooler weather of autumn, my favorite season. The leaves haven’t started changing here yet but should soon. What is your favorite season?