Lights

In honor of the larger bulb lights on our tree back in the 1960’s, I painted some for today’s prompt.

Their generous glow was gorgeous, but the bulbs became quite hot and we were warned not to touch them. Current bulbs have come a long way in terms of safety and types, but I love the nostalgia associated with these.

Olive Oil

I was intrigued by this subject because of the lights, darks, and reflections and have been working on this painting over the past six weeks or so. Although it has some good points and some wonky spots, I’m a bit pleased with the outcome but mostly what was learned during the painting process.

Olive Oil
Olive Oil

I won’t point out what I dislike because I know these places need some help, and why dwell on the negative? However, I am so happy with the reflection of the olive oil on the table surface as well as the dark shadows for the olives — I’ve never done anything with such a stark contrast and hope to do more in the future. Now to decide what do work on next in my Tuesday art class; there are so many options! Thanks for stopping by — have a great weekend!

Lights, #WorldWatercolorGroup

The first Christmas lights were invented by none other than Thomas Edison in 1880, at a time when folks used the dangerous practice of lighting Christmas trees with candles.  Because electricity was so expensive at that time and many people were mistrustful of it, commercial incandescent Christmas light bulbs were not popular until the early 1900s.  Since that time Christmas lights have gone through many upgrades and trends and have consistently become less expensive to buy and safer to use.  Blinking lights first made the scene in the 1920s and funky-looking bubble lights appeared by 1946.

These retro Christmas bulbs are reminiscent of the 1950s and 1960s and are the first ones I remember as a child.  There was nothing better than sitting in the darkened living room, illuminated only by the soft glow of the lit Christmas tree.

Christmas Lights

Christmas Lights

Twinkling midget lights came out in the late 1960s and have become safer, less expense, and more energy efficient, so much so that folks now cover their homes and yards with enormous displays, sometimes set to music.  Such displays are fun and quite entertaining to see, but I much prefer the cozy glow of the Christmas tree in our darkened living room.